Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Focus on Sunday with Dumisani: Malawi not able to feed its people again? Published for a short-lived Maravipost column on September 27, 2015



Who can ever forget how Malawi once "fed its own people" and made headlines for its agricultural success stories and being able to produce enough maize for people to eat and export?

We also heard how the late President Bingu wa Mutharika "dreamed in color" and saw a Greenbelt Irrigation scheme to utilize Malawi's water bodies so the "war on hunger had been won".

It did not make sense for a country blessed with a lot of water to only rely on rain-fed agriculture and when rains fail people starve.

This could have been the inspiration behind the praise song 'Mose wa lero' by Phungu Joseph Nkasa in tribute to Mutharika for his "vision and agricutlural policies which were seen as strengthening the country's food security through the fertilizer subsidy programme.

Well in the song Nkasa told us Malawians that Mutharika was like the biblical Moses delivering the Israelites from bondage in Egypt hence him delivering us as Malawians from hunger and eating madeya (maize husks).

Not only did we hear about Mutharika's successful fight against hunger in music....songs of praise were also heard afar including from the director of the New York–based Earth Institute at Columbia University, Jeffrey Sachs.

As recent as 2012, Sachs reminded us how in his final two years "Mutharika had actually engineered an agriculture-led boom in Malawi, one that pointed a way for Africa to overcome its chronic hunger, food insecurity, and periodic extreme famines." 


He also credited the late president for standing “bravely against the arrogance of an ill-informed foreign aid community back in 2005.”

According to Sachs writing in an op-ed in the New York Times, the positive legacy and success story of the Mutharika name held a key for "Africa’s future development and escape from poverty.”

Around the time government exported grain to Lesotho and Swaziland and who can forget the 400,000 tonnes of maize to Zimbabwe?

AFP in 2007 reported Malawi being "swamped with surplus maize from two bumper harvests" and in 2008 Malawi was in the news again when it donated to drought-hit Lesotho and Swaziland.

But that seems like a long lost and now colourless dream as Malawi is once again facing a food crisis following floods and other forces of nature and not forgetting the political mess that happened back then.

Fast forward eight years later and no major irrigation project is in sight.
Bingu's brother President Peter Mutharika has since appealed for international help to cope with an expected food shortage that could affect 17 percent of the country’s population in coming months.

In his national address on the food situation Mutharika said people in 25 of the country’s 28 districts are at risk of hunger.

"That is over two million people not being able to meet their annual food requirement and some $150 million being needed to attend to those in need of food assistance."

There has been so much tension with this food crisis that many Malawians on social media and on the streets took government to task for allegedly traveling with a large delegation to the United Nations General Assembly.

But why is Malawi facing its worst food crisis in a decade...what went wrong?
Archbishop of the Catholic Church Thomas Msusa during a memorial mass for late Mutharika in May seemed to have a clue.

He hailed Mutharika for "eradicating hunger in the country during his tenure in office through the Farm Input Subsidy Program(FISP)" but went further saying "let’s borrow a leaf from Israel which feeds Europe with fruits harvested from irrigation farming of which its water is taken from over 100 Kilometers away what about us, a country which was blessed with vast bodies of water."

It's mind boggling that a country where agriculture is the backbone of the economy and is home to Africa’s third-largest freshwater lake called Lake Malawi, less than three percent of the land is irrigated.

Could it be that more political will is needed at the highest level followed by reviving agriculture and irrigation to ensure food security?

51 years after Independence should Malawi seriously be relying on donors to give citizens maize the staple food or holding more prayers to ask God for rains when they fail because of man destroying the earth?

Climate change, deforestion, silation and so many things are also affecting the environment so where there is a political will there must be a way to ensure people have food on the table.

Even biblically in Genesis 41 during the seven years of plenty the land produced abundant crops, all of which Joseph collected and stored in the cities.

In each city he stored the food from the fields around it and ended up having so much grain and when the seven years of famine began there was food throughout Egypt. 


When it got worse and spread, Joseph "opened all the storehouses and sold grain to the Egyptians" so people from all over the world bought grain from him.

Food can be multiplied by proper planning and irrigation using rain or water harvesting methods on top of the rivers and Lake Malawi we have.

Do our governments plan for such problems or has fire fighting management been the order of the day for many years because there is no good reason for us Malawians to starve when there is plenty of water in the country.

Should one have to walk on water or air as a certain Prophet seemed to do to realize that Malawi can use its rivers and wind to irrigate and produce energy?







Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Tasting ancient Malawi’s sorghum grain and cassava (First published in Malawi Airlines Tiyende magazine)

Sorghum from https://theafricanpotnutrition.com/2014/02/04/sorghum-a-nutrition-packed-african-grain/grain/

Gone forever are the days of theka theka (half, half) sorghum and mapira flour offerings to Chauta, Namalenga, Mphambe at now extinct Malawi rain shrines.  But the grain seems to be making a comeback to complement maize during the constant droughts caused by the El Nino weather patterns.

Sorghum is a grain whose first recorded remains, dating back to 8000 BCE, were found in the Nabta Playa archaeological site in southern Egypt, writes Jane Summer in her article ‘Sorghum: The Must-have Gluten-free Ancient Grani.’

In Sudan, sorghum was also used as offerings at temples dedicated to Amun, a spiritual being they believed in.  The British Museum website reports that archaeo-botanical analyses of the mould shards excavated reveal that sorghum was the grain used to make offerings, not wheat and barley, as was used to make offering breads in Egypt.

However, pearl millet or black millet (machewere) was also used to make some local bread or cake for offerings in ancient Malawi.  Online records show the Sudanese farming it by 4000 BC before it spread to Egypt around 30000 BC and the rest of Africa. 


According to the only Sapitwa priestess in Malawi, Mayi Cecilia Jarden, sorghum (mapira) was also used in ufa (flour) offerings together with mawere (millet) while chikokeyani was the traditional beer put in mtsuko (clay pot) near a sacred tree, and thobwa the non-alcoholic drink one.

Both beer and the non-alcoholic drink were made using either millet or sorghum as well as for food offerings made during droughts.  She says when the Portuguese came between the 1500 and 1600s the maize they brought was also used as flour offerings, to cook nsima and for making some beer or liquor.

“Earlier ancestors didn’t know maize (corn) but makaka (dried cassava) and sorghum and millet, among other things when cooking nsima.  The youth of today don’t know these things and complain it sticks in the hand or is medicine, unlike in ancient times when children ate it like sweets.”

Ancestors knew nsima ya tandza from cassava and nsima ya mapira from sorghum which don’t need much water to grow and are healthy food products.

Raw Cassava

In Mulanje, southern Malawi, nandolo (pigeon peas) was prepared like porridge and a child would then drink water and feeling full, go to sleep.  Cassava as in tandaza was sticky like glue (ulimbo) and was eaten with many things including bush ice locally known as mbewa, explains Mayi Jarden, adding that dried cassava was pounded as in kutibula or kusinja.

This issue was also raised by one of five journalists invited by the US Mission to the United Nations Agencies in Rome, Italy for meetings at UN agencies including WFP and the UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development. 

In response to a question, Alexandre Meybeck, an FAO food and security change officer, explained how sorghum, compared with maize, is more drought resistant and has greater nutritional characteristics.  

However, he said the yield is lower so farmers produce less income from it so from a livelihood perspective there’s not much profit.

“Ideally on your farm you can have a combination of sorghum and maize for drought reasons.  There are farmers in areas of Malawi who have maize, cassava and sorghum.  

"This is precisely the trade-off between being more productive….you take modern varieties of maize and you put fertilizers, you have drought and you have nothing or being more resilient either as a farmer or country you have sorghum, all varieties of maize which don’t produce much and finally cassava” he said.


Research also shows that countries where cassava was consumed had less impact on their food insecurity because the prices of the cereals were linked to world markets.

Sorghum, the nutrition packed African grain, beyond porridge and chibuku, is also made like popcorn, boiled together with sugar beans (pinto beans) to make Nyekoe, a traditional dish from Lesotho and used in place of “teff” to make the traditional Ethiopian Inuera”, writes Cordialis Chipo, a registered dietician and founder of The African Pot Nutrition centre. 
Raw cassava : FAO

A Malawian taste of Supplì alla Romana (first published in Tiyende magazine for Malawi Airlines but blog photos)



It was about 5:20 am when Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET702 touched down in the ancient city of Rome, Italy, on a rather humid day after a very smooth and comfortable flight from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

It was transfer route from Lilongwe, Malawi so when I saw the ancient ruins of Rome, I knew my visit at the invitation of the US Mission to the United Nations Agencies in Rome for meetings with UN agencies would be successful.

I was among five journalists invited to Rome from 10-15 July for meetings with World Food Programme (WFP), the UN Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).

Luckily, at the airport a WFP official was there to welcome us and immigration proceedings went smoothly so we were able to rest at Hotel Fortyseven Albergo in Rome before a brief orientation and lunch on the rooftop balcony.


Ben Jumbe took this photo of me on the balcony restaurant

Just when we were about to order pasta one of the women spotted rice and we agreed to order that dish. In between, when the waitress brought what I thought was a complimentary snack, I got excited but alas it was not meant to be!

What I thought was the ordered lunch meal turned out to be a very tasty and delicious Italian appetizer known as Arancinci or Suppli.  I could taste the cheese and tomato sauce inside the rice rolled up into balls coated with breadcrumbs.

My lunch that day

 One of the male journalists, before tasting the rice balls, stressed how he was "an African man who needed food".  After tasting the appetizer he was silenced by its delicious taste.

Speaking with a beautiful heavy Italian accent, the waitress explained how Suppli in Sicily includes meat and other things, unlike the Roman cuisine which is mostly cheese. Back home in Malawi we easily prepare spaghetti with meatballs and macaroni and cheese.

The closest to suppli was when we rolled the meatballs full of breadcrumbs in cake or bread flour before frying, but it was nothing close to the Italian masterpiece. 
Ben from Uganda was a lot of fun

I also witnessed how some pasta dishes are served as a 'first courses in Italy", while others are prepared "in light lunches such as salads". 

Italy and its food were also in the back of my mind when the US Mission to the United Nations Agencies in Rome gave us a Roma 48 hours pass to visit historical sites in the city.

These included the Colosseum known as Colosseo, the biggest amphitheatre which started  in 72 AD by Vepasiamo of the Flavia family hence it is also known as the "Amphiteatrum Flavium".

Other tourist attraction sites included the Panteon, Fontana di trevi Piazza di Spagna and the Basilica San Pietro.

According to Agata D. Francesco of Blue Italy tour guide, the Colosseum’s ancient builders obtained volcanic dust, sand and lime mixed with cement like material to build the strong structures.

She said the ancient Romans built a foundation on volcanic rock and animal games were played inside during the morning and gladiator ones in the afternoon. 


“The arena was made of wood covered by a thick layer of sand to absorb blood.  The Romans got lions, giraffes and ostriches from Africa and found wild animals in the Saharan desert.

“They imported them and were paid and financed by rich people to get the exotic animals.  The red marble was from the south of Egypt, the yellow from Tunisia and the others from parts of Africa”, she said.

Ancient Rome was influenced by Egypt which it conquered after the Greeks hence the slaves were also likely used to carry things for building.  Egyptian style architecture is also seen among the Roman arcs.

Agata D. Francesco of Blue Italy tour guide

One well-known Roman figure in Africa was Julius Caesar, a Roman politician and politician. Caesar also connected to ancient Egypt’s Cleopatra was assassinated on March 5, 44 BC by Marchus Junius Brutus.

Caesar’s body was cremated, and on the site of his cremation, the Temple of Caesar was erected a few years later (at the east side of the main square of the Roman Forum. 

We saw the altar that remains during our historical tour of the ancient city which left us breathless and experiencing the best of Italy. 



A Malawian taste of Supplì alla Romana (first published in Tiyende magazine for Malawi Airlines but blog photos)



It was about 5:20 am when Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET702 touched down in the ancient city of Rome, Italy, on a rather humid day after a very smooth and comfortable flight from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

It was transfer route from Lilongwe, Malawi so when I saw the ancient ruins of Rome, I knew my visit at the invitation of the US Mission to the United Nations Agencies in Rome for meetings with UN agencies would be successful.

I was among five journalists invited to Rome from 10-15 July for meetings with World Food Programme (WFP), the UN Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).

Luckily, at the airport a WFP official was there to welcome us and immigration proceedings went smoothly so we were able to rest at Hotel Fortyseven Albergo in Rome before a brief orientation and lunch on the rooftop balcony.


Ben Jumbe took this photo of me on the balcony restaurant

Just when we were about to order pasta one of the women spotted rice and we agreed to order that dish.  In between, when the waitress brought what I thought was a complimentary snack, I got excited but alas it was not meant to be!

What I thought was the ordered lunch meal turned out to be a very tasty and delicious Italian appetizer known as Arancinci or Suppli.  I could taste the cheese and tomato sauce inside the rice rolled up into balls coated with breadcrumbs.

My lunch that day

 One of the male journalists, before tasting the rice balls, stressed how he was "an African man who needed food".  After tasting the appetizer he was silenced by its delicious taste.

Speaking with a beautiful heavy Italian accent, the waitress explained how Suppli in Sicily includes meat and other things, unlike the Roman cuisine which is mostly cheese. Back home in Malawi we easily prepare spaghetti with meatballs and macaroni and cheese.

The closest to suppli was when we rolled the meatballs full of breadcrumbs in cake or bread flour before frying, but it was nothing close to the Italian masterpiece. 
Ben from Uganda was a lot of fun

I also witnessed how some pasta dishes are served as a 'first courses in Italy", while others are prepared "in light lunches such as salads". 

Italy and its food were also in the back of my mind when the US Mission to the United Nations Agencies in Rome gave us a Roma 48 hours pass to visit historical sites in the city.   These included the Colosseum known as Colosseo, the biggest amphitheatre which started  in 72 AD by Vepasiamo of the Flavia family hence it is also known as the "Amphiteatrum Flavium".

Other tourist attraction sites included the Panteon, Fontana di trevi Piazza di Spagna and the Basilica San Pietro.

According to Agata D. Francesco of Blue Italy tour guide, the Colosseu’s ancient builders obtained volcanic dust, sand and lime mixed with cement like material to build the strong structures.

She said the ancient Romans built a foundation on volcanic rock and animal games were played inside during the morning and gladiator ones in the afternoon. 


“The arena was made of wood covered by a thick layer of sand to absorb blood.  The Romans got lions, giraffes and ostriches from Africa and found wild animals in the Saharan desert.

“They imported them and were paid and financed by rich people to get the exotic animals.  The red marble was from the south of Egypt, the yellow from Tunisia and the others from parts of Africa”, she said.

Ancient Rome was influenced by Egypt which it conquered after the Greeks hence the slaves were also likely used to carry things for building.  Egyptian style architecture is also seen among the Roman arcs.

Agata D. Francesco of Blue Italy tour guide

One well-known Roman figure in Africa was Julius Caesar, a Roman politician and politician. Caesar was also connected to ancient Egypt’s Cleopatra was assassinated on March 5, 44 BC by Marchus Junius Brutus.

Caesar’s body was cremated, and on the site of his cremation , the Temple of Caesar was erected a few years later (at the east side of the main square of the Roman Forum. 

We saw the altar that remains during our historical tour of the ancient city which left us breathless and experiencing the best of Italy. 



Tuesday, September 6, 2016

'Never-ending Escom/Waterboard supply woes' blog from 2015



From flying monkeys sabotaging Malawi’s valued but quite expensive electricity supply to opposition members or vandals somehow removing transformers for “chiwaya cooking oil” or “switching off” to sabotage ruling parties and weeds and silt terrorizing the Shire River, Malawians have heard it all…why many unplanned Escom blackouts have been happening over the years.

Heads of state have not been spared with electricity power failing when they addressed visiting Presidents making some ruling party officials suspect opposition leaders of sabotage in the absence of a working generator.

Even animals have been blamed with a monkey being accused of causing a serious black-out in the past. The monkey was again blamed last year when Escom announced it had encroached into Nkula A power station switch yard and “caused a short circuit” on a power line leading to massive power cuts.

This is not forgetting the low water level stories and the 2002 floating water weed which threatened to “choke the Shire river” which happened to be a major source of hydro-electric power.

The public relations department was kept busy taking journalists on a tour of affected areas to capture photos of the weeds on the river negatively affecting electricity generation during the rainy season.

The public was not spared and deforestation was said to be a contributing factor, and not forgetting that during most Escom blackout city dwellers rely on charcoal or firewood to cook creating a vicious and dangerous cycle.

One thing is very clear in our country…..blackouts have become the order of the day and the sound of generators the norm in some companies. Ironically not many environmental problems were reported before the 1990s and yes South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia and other African countries have also recently been experiencing the dreaded load shedding.

But the fact remains that it is 51 years of Independence and the Electricity Supply Corporation of Malawi Limited (Escom) is struggling to be heading towards power every day with a lot of excuses.

Some consumers on Facebook and Twitter have gone as far as nicknaming Escom the “Entertainer of the Year”.

The same can be said of various waterboards throughout the country with many Malawian women spotted in the cities balancing buckets on their heads hunting for water during periods when taps run dry.

Some of those living near dirty streams find an opportunity to make quick money by charging for city residents to use the water…..this is despite the fact that Malawi has rivers, streams and a lake.

So what exactly is the problem or the root of the problem one might ask? Is it only population growth and outdated equipment? Are forces of nature, human error or negligence by the public the real reasons consumers fail to access good services from Escom and Waterboards?
Does anyone have an answer that won't change next year?
Water is life
Blantyre Water Board (BWB) customers include domestic, industrial, institutional and commercial ones and there are an estimated 40,000 according to information on their website.  http://www.bwb.mw/

Yet out of those places like Chilobwe and Soche East don’t always have daily water supply and other places like BCA can stay for weeks without seeing a drop of water.

The same can be said of some out of town places like Bvumbwe in Thyolo were many can stay for weeks without water including in far away places as Mulanje….but the high bills continue being delivered.

It’s ironic that Mulanje with Mulanje Mountain nearby with plenty of water flowing down it can have residents without easy access to clean water. How long will the story-telling go on for…should people stop bathing or drinking water to prove a point that water is life and a necessity?


But Dziwe la Nkhalamba is a sacred pool despite what foreigners say but water can be used from Mt Mulanje


It’s also strange how countries which have less water are able to use it effectively.  In 1968 when former Malawi President Dr Hastings Kamuzu Banda addressed the Knesset in Israel he observed how they had a “desert with rocks all over” which they removed and “brought soil from far away and created fertile fields to grow many different crops.”

Israel was hardly 8000 square miles with a population of just over 2 million while Malawi was about 35,000 square miles of which 9000 was water…how are we using that water?!  Where did the flood water go...into the Indian Ocean and no rain or water harvesting?

Holland is said to be 41,500 km of which 7,700 is water but they are known to be good at water management.  Can’t Malawi borrow a leaf and apply it to some parts of Malawi prone to floods during some rain seasons whilst tackling deforestation and soil erosion?

Malawi needs to get organized since we have a lot of untreated water and make sure city residents and those living in villages get their money’s worth by ensuring a constant supply of clean water and providing it during shortages to prevent people from drinking and using dirty and unhygienic water.

Muddy water coming out of taps or seeing things floating in the water or delaying to use chlorine is wrong and an eyesore for those who pay for that water.

We need to apply what we learn from other nations after so many "familiarization tours" since the 1990s.  How many times will we be visiting Israel to learn more about irrigation?  Didn't we know that in 1968?

Electricity is not a luxury
If one checks Escom’s website they will notice a load-shedding schedule for today, Sunday, the 13th of September but they should not be surprised if the public utility does not stick to its schedule and catch people unawares. http://www.escom.mw/South/South%207-13%20September%202015.htm

Escom says its mandate is to “generate, transmit and distribute electricity in the country” and become a preferred “world class provider of reliable and sustainable electricity to the nation and in the region.”

We appeal to Escom to reduce the number of blackouts in the country and hope they will expand to cater for an increased population which seems to be still growing.

We don’t want to be reminded of the time US preacher and speaker Joyce Meyer visited Malawi and explained how her jet could not land at Chileka Airport because “the runway lights were not working” and then they had to fly to Lilongwe and after being booked in “a nice hotel…the lights went out” as soon as she entered the room and she had to find her way around using a candle using her own words.

Continuous blackouts are denting Malawi’s image and could scare away some potential investors bearing in mind not all of our rural areas are lit up!  So maybe it’s time to wake up…..’Dzuka Malawi’ as Francis Kalawe sings in his popular online song.

'Never-ending Escom/Waterboard supply woes' blog from 2015



From flying monkeys sabotaging Malawi’s valued but quite expensive electricity supply to opposition members or vandals somehow removing transformers for “chiwaya cooking oil” or “switching off” to sabotage ruling parties and weeds and silt terrorizing the Shire River, Malawians have heard it all…why many unplanned Escom blackouts have been happening over the years.

Heads of state have not been spared with electricity power failing when they addressed visiting Presidents making some ruling party officials suspect opposition leaders of sabotage in the absence of a working generator.

Even animals have been blamed with a monkey being accused of causing a serious black-out in the past. The monkey was again blamed last year when Escom announced it had encroached into Nkula A power station switch yard and “caused a short circuit” on a power line leading to massive power cuts.

This is not forgetting the low water level stories and the 2002 floating water weed which threatened to “choke the Shire river” which happened to be a major source of hydro-electric power.

The public relations department was kept busy taking journalists on a tour of affected areas to capture photos of the weeds on the river negatively affecting electricity generation during the rainy season.

The public was not spared and deforestation was said to be a contributing factor, and not forgetting that during most Escom blackout city dwellers rely on charcoal or firewood to cook creating a vicious and dangerous cycle.

One thing is very clear in our country…..blackouts have become the order of the day and the sound of generators the norm in some companies. Ironically not many environmental problems were reported before the 1990s and yes South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia and other African countries have also recently been experiencing the dreaded load shedding.

But the fact remains that it is 51 years of Independence and the Electricity Supply Corporation of Malawi Limited (Escom) is struggling to be heading towards power every day with a lot of excuses.

Some consumers on Facebook and Twitter have gone as far as nicknaming Escom the “Entertainer of the Year”.

The same can be said of various waterboards throughout the country with many Malawian women spotted in the cities balancing buckets on their heads hunting for water during periods when taps run dry.

Some of those living near dirty streams find an opportunity to make quick money by charging for city residents to use the water…..this is despite the fact that Malawi has rivers, streams and a lake.

So what exactly is the problem or the root of the problem one might ask? Is it only population growth and outdated equipment? Are forces of nature, human error or negligence by the public the real reasons consumers fail to access good services from Escom and Waterboards?
Does anyone have an answer that won't change next year?
Water is life
Blantyre Water Board (BWB) customers include domestic, industrial, institutional and commercial ones and there are an estimated 40,000 according to information on their website.  http://www.bwb.mw/

Yet out of those places like Chilobwe and Soche East don’t always have daily water supply and other places like BCA can stay for weeks without seeing a drop of water.

The same can be said of some out of town places like Bvumbwe in Thyolo were many can stay for weeks without water including in far away places as Mulanje….but the high bills continue being delivered.

It’s ironic that Mulanje with Mulanje Mountain nearby with plenty of water flowing down it can have residents without easy access to clean water. How long will the story-telling go on for…should people stop bathing or drinking water to prove a point that water is life and a necessity?

But Dziwe la Nkhalamba is a sacred pool despite what foreigners say but water can be used from Mt Mulanje


It’s also strange how countries which have less water are able to use it effectively.  In 1968 when former Malawi President Dr Hastings Kamuzu Banda addressed the Knesset in Israel he observed how they had a “desert with rocks all over” which they removed and “brought soil from far away and created fertile fields to grow many different crops.”

Israel was hardly 8000 square miles with a population of just over 2 million while Malawi was about 35,000 square miles of which 9000 was water…how are we using that water?!  Where did the flood water go...into the Indian Ocean and no rain or water harvesting?

Holland is said to be 41,500 km of which 7,700 is water but they are known to be good at water management.  Can’t Malawi borrow a leaf and apply it to some parts of Malawi prone to floods during some rain seasons whilst tackling deforestation and soil erosion?

Malawi needs to get organized since we have a lot of untreated water and make sure city residents and those living in villages get their money’s worth by ensuring a constant supply of clean water and providing it during shortages to prevent people from drinking and using dirty and unhygienic water.

Muddy water coming out of taps or seeing things floating in the water or delaying to use chlorine is wrong and an eyesore for those who pay for that water.

We need to apply what we learn from other nations after so many "familiarization tours" since the 1990s.  How many times will we be visiting Israel to learn more about irrigation?  Didn't we know that in 1968?

Electricity is not a luxury
If one checks Escom’s website they will notice a load-shedding schedule for today, Sunday, the 13th of September but they should not be surprised if the public utility does not stick to its schedule and catch people unawares. http://www.escom.mw/South/South%207-13%20September%202015.htm

Escom says its mandate is to “generate, transmit and distribute electricity in the country” and become a preferred “world class provider of reliable and sustainable electricity to the nation and in the region.”

We appeal to Escom to reduce the number of blackouts in the country and hope they will expand to cater for an increased population which seems to be still growing.

We don’t want to be reminded of the time US preacher and speaker Joyce Meyer visited Malawi and explained how her jet could not land at Chileka Airport because “the runway lights were not working” and then they had to fly to Lilongwe and after being booked in “a nice hotel…the lights went out” as soon as she entered the room and she had to find her way around using a candle using her own words.

Continuous blackouts are denting Malawi’s image and could scare away some potential investors bearing in mind not all of our rural areas are lit up!  So maybe it’s time to wake up…..’Dzuka Malawi’ as Francis Kalawe sings in his popular online song.

Took this picture of children in Milange, Mozambique admiring visiting Malawian children

Tracing footsteps to lead me home

Greetings from the Warm Heart Africa, Malawi.

I'm a Malawian journalist who grew up in many countries including South Africa, Belgium, then West Germany, UK, Washington DC and New York in the US and I love New York.

Trying to come up with the production of my life and by compiling some of my 1000 poems into a book called ‘Tracing Footsteps’ to lead me Home with excellent photography.

I also plan to film award winning documentaries based on the history of this ancient land called Malawi and the mysteries of Sapitwa and the Sirius star.

.....watch this space.


Pages